Sunday, June 11, 2017

and now the company jumps



He was a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way.
He had a boogie style that no one else could play.
He was the top man at his craft,
But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft.
He's in the army now.  He's blowin' reveille.
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




They made him blow a bugle for his Uncle Sam.
It really brought him down because he could not jam.
The captain seemed to understand,
Because the next day the cap' went out and drafted the band.
And now the company jumps --
When he plays reveille.
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




A root, a toot, a toode-lee-a-da-toot,
He blows it eight to the bar in boogie rhythm.
He can't blow a note unless a bass and guitar is playin' with him.
And the company jumps -- when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




He was some boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.


And when he played his boogie woogie bugle, he was busy as a "bzzz" bee.


And when he played he made the company jump eight to the bar;
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




And a - root - a toot, a toodeliata-toodeliata toot toot
He blows it eight to the bar.
He can't blow a note if a bass and guitar isn't with him.
And the company jumps -- when he plays reveille.
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




He puts the boys to sleep with boogie every night,
And wakes 'em up the same way in the early bright.
They clap their hands and stamp their feet,
'Cause they know how it goes when someone gives him a beat.
Woah, woah, he wakes 'em up -- when he plays reveille --
The boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.




A root, a toot, a toodeli-a-da to toot toot toot
He's blowin' eight to the bar.
Yeah, he can't blow a note if a bass and guitar isn't, woah, with him.
And the company jumps, when he plays reveille --
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B.


________________________________


1972


In the year of the Watergate break-in, Bette Midler had a Top Ten hit with the song, "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy."


[Free Encyclopedia online]  ----------------- Written thirty-one years earlier by Don Raye and Hughie Prince, "BWBB" had been recorded at Decca's Hollywood studios on January 2, 1941.  It was a year before the United States entered World War II but after the start of a peacetime draft to expand the armed forces in anticipation of American involvement.


The flip side of the record was "Bounce Me, Brother, with a Solid Four."  The Andrews Sisters introduced both songs in the Abbott and Costello film, Buck Privates (released January 1941)....




"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" is closely based on an earlier Raye-Prince hit, "Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar," which is about a virtuoso boogie-woogie piano player. ------------------------------- [end, Free Encyclopedia excerpt]




On Google, type in


boogie woogie bugle boy, bette midler


and Play.





After listening to that version of the song,


Type in boogie woogie bugle boy, the Andrews sisters


There's one where it shows the song's lyrics on a gray background, and there's one where you see the Andrews Sisters.





You can Play the one with the lyrics and sing along, or Play the one with the photo and watch the performance, or


Both.


After that, type in


boogie woogie bugle boy, Katy Perry





and


Play.


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"Hundreds of thousands of dollars in unaccounted cash," the GAO man said one day.  ----------------------------  [excerpt:  1974 - Simon & Schuster - Woodward and Bernstein - All The President's Men]  ------------------------  "A slush fund of cash," he said the next.  "A rat's nest behind the surface efficiency of computerized financial reporting," the third. 


With each day that Woodward did not write a story, the investigator felt freer to talk to him.  Fitting these remarks together with another investigator's, Woodward was becoming convinced that the cash "slush fund" was the same "convention security money" Bernstein had heard about early in July. 


The fund, which totaled at least $100,000, included the money from Barker's bank account obtained from cashing Dahlberg's check, according to the investigator.




Bernstein made one of his regular calls to the former administration official and was told:  "There was a large fund over which Gordon Liddy





had supervision. ...  Yeah, it's the same one.  The present plan is for Liddy to take the fall for everyone.  The story that the re-election committee will put out has nothing to do with the truth.  ------------------------------  [end, Excerpt]